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Category Archives for "Clinical Biochemistry"

Peptide hormones: Pancreatic secretions – 1

The pancreas was first identified for western civilization by Herophilus (335–280 BC), a Greek anatomist and surgeon. Only a few hundred years later, Rufus of Ephesus, another Greek anatomist, gave the pancreas its name. The pancreas secrets three different peptide hormones. They are Insulin, Glucagon and Stomatostatin. Anatomy of Pancreas: The pancreas (from pankreas: panG=all, […]

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  • Updated December 2, 2015

Gastro Intestinal Hormones: Controls Digestive system

The digestion and absorption of nutrients is a complicated process which is regulated by the automatic nervous system. This occurs in association with peptide hormones of Gastro-Intestinal Tract (GIT). The specialized cells lining the Gastro Intestinal Track are responsible for the production of Gastro Intestinal hormones. Hence Gastro Intestinal Track may be considered as the largest mass […]

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  • Updated July 15, 2019

Hormone is the basic chemical messengers

The term Hormone (hormaoG= to excite) was first used by ‘William M.Bayliss’ and his brother-in-law ‘Ernest H.Starling’, both of London University college, in 1904, who showed that a chemical stimulate the action of a pancreatic secretion. These substances were then called “Chemical Messengers”. What are Hormones: According to “Went & Thimann” (1937), “A substance which […]

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  • Updated January 19, 2017

What are Neurotransmitters and Neuroactive Peptides

Communication of information between neurons is accomplished by movement of chemicals across a small gap called the “synapse”. Chemicals, called neurotransmitters, are released from one neuron at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. Neurotransmitters then cross the synapse where they may be accepted by the next neuron at a specialized site called a “Receptor“. The action that […]

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  • Updated January 19, 2017

Biochemistry of Human Milk

Biochemistry is the study of the structure, composition, and chemical reactions of substances in living systems. Biochemistry emerged as a separate discipline when scientists combined biology with organic, inorganic, or physical chemistry and began to study such topics as how living things obtain energy from food, the chemical basis of heredity, and what fundamental changes […]

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  • Updated May 20, 2019